Tag Archives: tennis tips

SMT Daily Tip #8: A Major 2H-Backhand Key

(This video is derived from Topspin Tennis’s YouTube channel)

There’s a very specific piece in Kei Nishikori’s backhand that I want you to focus on (@ 0:16).

Kei Nishikori backhand

You can see here that Nishikori has dropped his racket head below the ball, to the point where it’s almost touching the ground. Note that he does this by raising his right-hand above his left-hand, which is what you must do too!

Why does he do this right before he swings? It is to get the buttcap of the racket pointing at the ball! When Nishikori points his buttcap at the ball, it allows him to achieve more effortless power out of the shot and make consistent and strong contact with the ball.

Making this small adjustment should improve your two-handed backhand immediately.

Hope you found this quick tip helpful and feel free to ask any questions regarding your game!

For a comprehensive breakdown of the backhand technique, check out: https://simplemoderntennis.wordpress.com/two-handed-backhand/

 

 

 

 

 

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SMT Daily Tip #7: Benefits of the Swinging Volley

(Note that these are not my videos, but videos that I found)

The swinging volley is a very aggressive shot where you are hitting the ball out of the air with a normal groundstroke. Players commonly use this shot to capitalize on high-floating returns. The benefits that you can reap from using the swinging volley is cutting time away from your opponent. Being able to hit this shot will ,without a doubt, give you an offensive advantage over your opponent.

However, why can’t you just put the high-floating ball away with a volley? Of course you can, and that is up to you. If you think that hitting a volley will surely put the ball away and is a safer route, then go for it. Though, the potent upside of the swinging volley compared to the regular punch volley is that it is much easier to put the ball away due to the high pace you would be imparting on the ball since you are practically hitting a groundstroke.

Also, being able to hit a swinging volley is an indicator of good technique; it demonstrates that you are able to drive through the ball well. In fact, practicing swinging volleys is commonly used for developing groundstroke technique and power.

The swinging volley is definitely a specialty shot that should be a part of your arsenal. Being able to hit the shot will give you more confidence in your offensive game and you will find yourself being able to absolutely dominate the high balls that pushers often hit to you. Although the swinging volley is a great tool and is flashy, it should be used wisely. If you can certainly put the ball away with a volley then do that instead. If you are confident enough that you can hit the swinging volley, then by all means do it, for it is a message to your opponent that floating balls back is not the answer to winning against you.

Employ the swinging volley today and notice a notable improvement in your offensive game. Hope you found this information helpful and feel free to ask any questions regarding your game!

SMT Daily Tip #6: Safest Shots to Hit When Pulled Out Wide

What are the safest shots to hit when your opponent pulls you out wide?

The safest shots to hit when you are put in this type of danger are: the down-the-line loop and the loop down the middle.

Looping the ball DTL allows you to have more time to recover back and restart the rally. Also, looping the ball DTL is much safer than hitting it flat DTL since you are clearing the net by a large margin. If the shot is done correctly and lands deep in the court then it will be really difficult for your opponent to hit an offensive shot. In fact, because it is deep and is placed far from where your opponent hit his/her shot, your opponent might get pushed back behind the baseline, potentially putting him/her in the defensive depending on how he/she hits the ball. If not, the least you can get out of looping the ball back DTL is restarting the rally, making this shot selection very potent.

Looping the ball down the middle is also considered a safe shot. This is because when you aim it down the middle, you are clearing the lowest part of the net and the chances of the ball landing out wide are practically zero. The benefits you can reap from this shot are: more recovery time and – if hit deep enough – a high chance to restart the rally. This shot selection is commonly used clearly for its safeness and being easily executable. However, do not use this shot every time, for your opponent will catch on and take it out of the air with a swinging-volley.

Now, the key component that these two shots have that make them effective is that they must be hit deep! Depth is absolutely crucial. If they are not hit deep enough, then this allows your opponent to hit another offensive shot.

In conclusion, it is important that you learn to utilize both of these defensive shots since they are the safest shots that can get you out of a losing position. With these shots, your game, without a doubt, will become more solid. And remember, depth is crucial.

I hope this was helpful! Feel free to leave comments or questions regarding your game below. I will be glad to answer all of them!

SMT Daily Tip #5: Work on Your Sharp-Angled Shots!

If you want to take your defensive game – and even offensive game – to the next level, learning how to hit sharp angles is very valuable.

Being able to hit sharp-angled cross-court forehands and backhands gives you a major advantage against net players. With such a shot in your arsenal, you can pass them with ease and shatter their net-approach tactic.

(This video example may be a little extreme but gets the point across)

(Also check out the point starting at 2:00)


On top of that, being able to hit this shot enables you to hit winners that you’ve never been able to really hit before. Even if you end up not hitting a winner with this shot, you can pull your opponent way off the court which will give you absolute dominance over the point from then on.

(Check out the point at 1:36)

As you can see, being able to hit sharp angles will definitely up your whole game, so I highly encourage that everyone makes an effort to practice this shot and eventually have it be a part of your arsenal. Go out on the court and give it a go!

Feel free to leave any questions; I will be glad to answer them!

SMT Quick Tip #4: Playing Closer to the Baseline

 

Kei Nishikori, known for being an aggressive baseliner, hugs the baseline as much as possible throughout this point. Here, Nishikori perfectly displays the advantages of playing close to the baseline: cutting time away from the opponent, being able to hit winners easily, and overall having more control over the point.  It literally appeared like Nishikori was bossing Nadal around on the court. In fact, Nishikori won this match.

Keep in mind that you should not be hugging the baseline 24/7. You can probably get away with this on your serve but when on your opponent’s serve, come up to the baseline only when the opportunity presents itself. This is for obvious reasons. Say your opponent hits a serve nearly out of your reach and you float it back. Is it really smart to hug the baseline then? No, you should get farther behind the baseline and defend. Though, if you are able to hit a damaging return, be prepared to capitalize on the next set of shots by coming up closer to the baseline. You can also creep up to the baseline on your opponent’s second serve. Or even during a rally, if you know you just hit a damaging shot, step into the court.

It all comes down to being strategic and having good instinct about this when you play. Knowing when to defend and especially step in is something that should be emphasized in practices. When you can constantly step into the court and hug the baseline when the time presents itself, your game will improve significantly – all of a sudden, you are raking in more winners, wearing down your opponent side to side, and winning more points (especially against troublesome defenders) as a result.

Hope this information was helpful! If you have any questions or if you need help on your game leave a comment below, or email me – simplemoderntennis@gmail.com

SMT Quick Tip #3: Wrong-Footing Your Opponent

A very effective tactic used to wrong-foot your opponent is aiming the ball behind him. What does aiming the ball behind your opponent mean? It is when you aim the ball back to the same place where your opponent struck right before.

Remember that in tennis that after you strike the ball you have to recover and be ready to cover the higher percentage shot. This usually means you have to side-shuffle away from the place you just struck the ball at unless you hit the ball cross-court (since if you aim it CC, the return would be a CC back to you). So when is the most effective time to execute this tactic? The best time would be when your opponent hits a down-the-line shot because now he has to go and recover to the higher percentage shot leaning towards the other side.

When executed correctly, your opponent will be in trouble having to immediately change directions and cover more space. There will also be many cases where your opponent will be completely thrown off balance by your shot that he won’t be able to reach the ball in time, if executed perfectly. Maybe your opponent could be completely wrong-footed and stumble.

This tactic does not only apply to groundstroke exchanges. You can most definitely apply this to your net game as well – hit an approach shot and hit your first volley towards the same spot. This tactic is a must-add to your arsenal!

Check out this video (At 7:13) of Kei Nishikori incredibly displaying this tactic against Rafael Nadal!:

Also check out this video (At 1:53) of Tommy Haas demonstrate hitting the ball behind Roger Federer: