Tag Archives: atp backhand

SMT Daily Tip #8: A Major 2H-Backhand Key

(This video is derived from Topspin Tennis’s YouTube channel)

There’s a very specific piece in Kei Nishikori’s backhand that I want you to focus on (@ 0:16).

Kei Nishikori backhand

You can see here that Nishikori has dropped his racket head below the ball, to the point where it’s almost touching the ground. Note that he does this by raising his right-hand above his left-hand, which is what you must do too!

Why does he do this right before he swings? It is to get the buttcap of the racket pointing at the ball! When Nishikori points his buttcap at the ball, it allows him to achieve more effortless power out of the shot and make consistent and strong contact with the ball.

Making this small adjustment should improve your two-handed backhand immediately.

Hope you found this quick tip helpful and feel free to ask any questions regarding your game!

For a comprehensive breakdown of the backhand technique, check out: https://simplemoderntennis.wordpress.com/two-handed-backhand/

 

 

 

 

 

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Power On Our Groundstrokes

In today’s professional game, power in players’ strokes have become a paramount factor in determining their success/potential. Players are unable to apply pressure to their opponents without enough power. In fact, people who do not have enough power are the ones who are most likely to get pushed around. Being unable to produce power, hitting winners become more difficult and thus you end up having to rely only on your opponent’s errors in order to win points.

Power really adds another dimension to your game: being able to hit winners at will and applying enormous amounts of pressure onto your opponent at even unpredictable times – it just profoundly enhances your game and makes tennis less of a grind. However, of course, using power tends to strongly correlate with making errors but the benefits of possessing power greatly outweighs this con.

Take a look at Ferrer’s match with Djokovic at the Australian Open 2013 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EN4Q2zu4oyY). Compared to Djokovic, Ferrer has no real fire power. What makes things worse is that his ball speed never really changes and that is the reason why having power is so important. With power comes a larger range of gauging your ball speed. What makes gauging ball speed so advantageous is that your play becomes more unpredictable and the opponent will always be on his/her toes. Ferrer is a clear example of how damaging it is not changing ball speeds. Just look at Djokovic! Producing winners left and right, Djokovic throughout the whole match was in such a smooth balance and a fantastic rhythm. What makes it an even worse of a nightmare for Ferrer is that Djokovic can willingly power up his shots. It is just clear that Ferrer is always at a huge disadvantage going up against Djokovic, and the rest of the top guys.

On the other hand, Djokovic masterfully demonstrates why power is an important asset to be at the very top of the game. With power – whenever he sees an opening during the rally – he can end the point right then and there. Many instances during this match Djokovic would be hitting his typical rally-ball and then out of nowhere he will inject a lot of pace into the ball. As a result,  Ferrer will be caught completely off-guard and be put on the defensive. This is something Ferrer can not do as well as others. However, his fitness and machine-like consistency makes up for it – enough to keep him in the top 10 for many years now.

Although having power is not absolutely necessary, it’s an important dimension that can make points less physically burdening instead of having to grind out points continuously.

Breakdown of Marcos Baghdatis Forehand (Modern Technique)

Quick Tennis Tip: Keep Your Head Fixed at Contact!

On all of your strokes, whether it is the forehand, backhand, volley, smash, or serve. You should have your head and eyes fixed on the contact point (where you strike the ball) until the ball leaves your racket.

Note that it is impossible to keep your eyes on the ball at impact because the ball comes and leaves too fast.The goal here is to just keep your head and eyes fixed on the contact point. When you do this, you will strike the ball cleaner and also decrease the chance of mishitting. If you do not keep your eyes and head fixed on the contact zone, you will disrupt the swing path because you end up jerking your head up too soon to see where the ball is going.

As you can see Federer below, he is not watching the ball, but he is keeping his head and eyes fixed at the contact zone to prevent the disruption of the swing path to the ball.

ANDRE AGASSI SAYS HE PRIMARILY USES HIS RIGHT HAND ON THE TWO-HANDED BACKHAND

From reading through many threads and videos on the two-handed backhand, the majority of people argue that the two-handed backhand is basically a lefty forehand.

However, tennis-legend, Andre Agassi, who possesses one of the best two-handed backhands in the game, says otherwise.

Andre Agassi: “I hit my backhand primarily with my right hand.” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcZFVQCfOQg – He states this after the point at the 12 minute mark)

I initially did not believe Andre Agassi knew what he was talking about due to the fact that many people said otherwise, but after experimenting with the technique and observing a lot of slow motion footage, it seems after all, Agassi knows what he’s saying. How could I have ever doubted him?

It’s understandable that his statement will yield different interpretations. People will think that you lead with the right hand throughout the entire shot; however, this is not what he meant by primarily using his right hand.

The right hand is the key to produce leverage. Leverage is achieved when the buttcap of the racket is pointed at the ball and the right hand is what gets you into that position.

The use of the right hand happens during the forward swing phase. From the takeback, notice how the left hand is leveled higher than the right hand.

Left hand leveled higher than right hand

Now in the forward swing, the right hand will be dominant. When beginning the forward swing and uncoiling the body, the positions change; the right hand drops, causing the left hand to fall below it. Here, proper leverage has been achieved.

Right hand drops, left hand falls below the right.

All of this is what Agassi meant by him “primarily using his right hand.”

Though, in the end, as a result of the uncoiling, the left-hand will propel forward naturally and strike through the ball.

It makes sense for people to say that the two-handed backhand is similar to a lefty forehand because the left-hand is what really strikes the ball, but the forward swing phase and use of the right hand is what makes it not exactly like a lefty forehand. The right hand plays a key role in creating leverage and that is why Agassi says that the best backhanders in the world  use their right hand in the shot.

Also check out my video talking about the key to leverage on the two-handed backhand:

Feel free to leave questions and suggestions for future videos and articles!